Director + Storyteller //chase@eightpp.com // Woke // · ATL ·
Reblogged from drtyrock  31,475 notes

midnight-pursona:

"Your too fat."

"I didn’t know [insert character] was black!"

"Why don’t you do more black cosplays?"

"Cosplay to your size!"

"I don’t think that looks right on you, why don’t you cosplay [insert character] instead?"

"Why is [insert character] black? They’re not black in the show."

"You shouldn’t cross-play, it looks weird on you."

"Your boobs are too big for [insert character]."

To everyone who as ever posted a comment or question like this, my answer:

I am a black plus size female cosplayer, if you don’t like it… well honestly I don’t care. The more you comment like an idiot, the more it feeds my will power to prove I’m an amazing cosplayer, not matter what you say. I may have days, or even weeks when I feel down about myself, but that will never stop me from doing what I love. I may have large boobs, chubby stomach, double chin, hair on my face, dark spots around my face and body, and a flat butt, but I rock any cosplay I put on. So grow up, and get out of my face. <3

Reblogged from wocinsolidarity  4,724 notes

wocinsolidarity:

scorpius-rising:

So CNN just showed a report on the royal visit to New Zealand, which not only actively mocked the cultural traditions of the Maori, comparing the haka to the mating dance of the emu, but also denigrated the cultural traditions of many other groups as being ‘native’ and generally silly. It’s this kind of shoddy journalism and blatant racism that perpetuates an idea of multiculturalism being some kind of childish joke and trivialises the identity of 15% of NZ’s population. If you want to do something about it, there is a complaint here, and the petition associated with it here.  .

SIGNAL BOOST

Reblogged from lovedivika  1,888 notes
biishiki:


knowledgeequalsblackpower:


TRUGANINI: THE LAST “FULL BLOOD” TASMANIAN
In May 7, 1876, Truganini, [erroneously considered to be] the last “full-blood” Black person in Tasmania, died at 73 years of age. Her mother had been stabbed to death by a European. Her sisters were kidnapped by Europeans [and sold into slavery]. Her intended husband was drowned by two Europeans in her presence, while his murderers raped her.
It might be accurately said that Truganini’s numerous personal sufferings typify the tragedy of the Black people of Tasmania as a whole. “Don’t let them cut me up,” she begged the doctor as she lay dying. After her burial, Truganini’s body was exhumed, and her skeleton, strung upon wires and placed upright in a box, became for many years the most popular exhibit in the Tasmanian Museum and remained on display until 1947.
Finally, in 1976–the centenary years of Truganini’s death–despite the museum’s objections, her skeleton was cremated and her ashes scattered at sea.

But that’s not the end of the story. After demands from Tanzania’s Aboriginal community, the British Museum returned Truganini hair and skin samples in 2002 (along with bones from other unidentified aborigines). Yet, about 30 copies of the bust of her made by an English sculptor remain on display around the world. 
(via Invasion, Theft, Rape, Murder: The Aboriginal Holocaust in Tasmania)

And this is the history of Australia

biishiki:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

TRUGANINI: THE LAST “FULL BLOOD” TASMANIAN

In May 7, 1876, Truganini, [erroneously considered to be] the last “full-blood” Black person in Tasmania, died at 73 years of age. Her mother had been stabbed to death by a European. Her sisters were kidnapped by Europeans [and sold into slavery]. Her intended husband was drowned by two Europeans in her presence, while his murderers raped her.

It might be accurately said that Truganini’s numerous personal sufferings typify the tragedy of the Black people of Tasmania as a whole. “Don’t let them cut me up,” she begged the doctor as she lay dying. After her burial, Truganini’s body was exhumed, and her skeleton, strung upon wires and placed upright in a box, became for many years the most popular exhibit in the Tasmanian Museum and remained on display until 1947.

Finally, in 1976–the centenary years of Truganini’s death–despite the museum’s objections, her skeleton was cremated and her ashes scattered at sea.

But that’s not the end of the story. After demands from Tanzania’s Aboriginal community, the British Museum returned Truganini hair and skin samples in 2002 (along with bones from other unidentified aborigines). Yet, about 30 copies of the bust of her made by an English sculptor remain on display around the world

(via Invasion, Theft, Rape, Murder: The Aboriginal Holocaust in Tasmania)

And this is the history of Australia

Reblogged from nativeamericannews  16 notes
nativeamericannews:

6 Recommendations for Adapting to Climate Change, From the United Nations Report
On April 1, the United Nations Working Group II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a somber report detailing not only the climate-change-related problems that are in store for us, but also, more immediately, the ones that are already manifest. Among the latter are excess flooding, extreme weather events and food shortages.

nativeamericannews:

6 Recommendations for Adapting to Climate Change, From the United Nations Report

On April 1, the United Nations Working Group II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a somber report detailing not only the climate-change-related problems that are in store for us, but also, more immediately, the ones that are already manifest. Among the latter are excess flooding, extreme weather events and food shortages.


Reblogged from speaktyron  22 notes

speaktyron:

Dear Mainstream America/Nations Police,

When we were children we were taught that we should run to the police if we are in trouble, need protection, or are afraid in any way. That they are there to “serve and protect”. For a while we bought into that, even want to become police officers, as I did when I was young, that is until we see that if you are black or brown your rights as a human being  are questionable let alone your basic American rights. That They aren’t real life super heroes but Overseer’s only this time instead of a whip they wield a Glock 9mm. This instills a sense of fear that festers into a sense of racial bias and then becomes anger. An anger that grew the “Fuck The Police”  and “No Snitchin” movements into nationwide phenomenons. You “mainstream” Americans would have the world to believe this doesn’t happen, that minorities are just criminalistic savages that cant take being dealt justice. I ask you, is this the justice you speak of? The justice your white privilege has afforded you? Your default status has given you yet another luxury, a sense of blindness to these blatant injustices. One that I and millions of others never have been extended. You trivialize our anger as being too sensitive and racially conscious. That we just don’t understand that they are only doing their jobs. You slap on extra charges on those of us that run from these members of an overwhelmingly under-managed and unchecked section of society, because of a fear you’ve given us. Too many times have we seen family members pulled over for the classic “your tint is too dark” or “your back lights are out” only to harass us and further ingrain into our heads that the ink on our freedom papers isn’t yet dry. There is a sense of trepidation that consumes us when police are near, even when we arent doing anything wrong, because we know of  our own  Amadou Diallo, Sean Bell,  Reginald Doucet and countless others before and after them that have been shot dozens of times for doing less than nothing and you got away with it all under the cover of your badge You have reinforced your power with such vicious displays of bravado I’m becoming aware who the animals with no cages are although I almost forgot.

Thanks For The Reminder,
Tyron

PS; Hey Cop that little tid bit around the 1:51 mark where you informed Donrell Breaux you would shoot him in the head, was that just personal flair or state issued tactics?

Reblogged from goodbestfriend  1,472 notes

goodbestfriend:

roojieq:

sumayaabdisalam15:

Amber Riley & Kevin McHale ▶ Let’s Wait Awhile (Glee Cast Version)

Yes. Artcedes duet omg yes yes yes

How the hell are these out already?!? I wasn’t ready

OMG!!! I Waited 4 Years For This Duet From The Best Singers On Glee (Amber Riley -&- Kevin McHale -or- Mercedes Jones -&- Artie Abrams)!!!

  • Track: Let's Wait Awhile (Glee Cast Version)
  • Artist: Amber Riley & Kevin McHale
  • Album: Glee: The Music, Tested
  • Plays: 29666